Nand Kishor Contributor

Nand Kishor is the Product Manager of House of Bots. After finishing his studies in computer science, he ideated & re-launched Real Estate Business Intelligence Tool, where he created one of the leading Business Intelligence Tool for property price analysis in 2012. He also writes, research and sharing knowledge about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Data Science, Big Data, Python Language etc... ...

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Nand Kishor is the Product Manager of House of Bots. After finishing his studies in computer science, he ideated & re-launched Real Estate Business Intelligence Tool, where he created one of the leading Business Intelligence Tool for property price analysis in 2012. He also writes, research and sharing knowledge about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Data Science, Big Data, Python Language etc...

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Adidas to mass-produce 3D-printed shoe with Silicon Valley start-up Carbon

By Nand Kishor |Email | Mar 1, 2017 | 8751 Views

Adidas launched a new sneaker on Friday, with a 3D-printed sole that it plans to mass-produce next year, part of a broader push by the German sportswear firm to react faster to changing fashions and to create more customised products.

Adidas already lets people customise the colour and pattern of shoes ordered online, but new 3D printing methods will make small production runs, limited edition shoes, and even soles designed to fit an individual's weight and gait economical.

Competitors Nike, Under Armour and New Balance have also been experimenting with 3D printing, but have so far only used the technique to make prototypes, soles tailored for sponsored athletes and a handful of high-priced novelty shoes.

That's because traditional 3D printers are slower, more expensive and often create an inferior product than the injection moulds for plastic that are currently used to produce hundreds of millions of shoes each year, mostly in Asia.

However, Adidas says its new partnership with Silicon Valley start-up Carbon allows it to overcome many of those difficulties to produce a sole that can rival one made by an injection mould, and at a speed and price that allow for mass production.

Adidas launched a new sneaker on Friday, with a 3D-printed sole that it plans to mass-produce next year, part of a broader push by the German sportswear firm to react faster to changing fashions and to create more customised products.

Adidas already lets people customise the colour and pattern of shoes ordered online, but new 3D printing methods will make small production runs, limited edition shoes, and even soles designed to fit an individual's weight and gait economical.

Competitors Nike, Under Armour and New Balance have also been experimenting with 3D printing, but have so far only used the technique to make prototypes, soles tailored for sponsored athletes and a handful of high-priced novelty shoes.

That's because traditional 3D printers are slower, more expensive and often create an inferior product than the injection moulds for plastic that are currently used to produce hundreds of millions of shoes each year, mostly in Asia.

However, Adidas says its new partnership with Silicon Valley start-up Carbon allows it to overcome many of those difficulties to produce a sole that can rival one made by an injection mould, and at a speed and price that allow for mass production.

"Walk before you run"

Carbon's technology will allow Adidas to make small batches of shoes far more quickly. Small production runs were not economical before, as the metal moulds for most soles need to be used 10,000 times to pay for themselves, and take four to six weeks to cast and grind.

"What you can do is introduce more types of products without a cost penalty," said Terry Wohlers, head of Wohlers Associates, a US consultancy specialising in 3D printing. "With this technology, you can produce one or a few inexpensively."

Wohlers expects the 3D printing industry to more than quadruple sales to $26 billion by 2022, driven mostly by the automotive, medical, dental and jewellery sectors.

Adidas initially plans batches of shoes tailored to specific sports or cities but hopes consumers will eventually be measured and tested in store to design perfectly-fitting shoes tweaked for an individual's gait, weight and type of sport.


Source: http://www.livemint.com/Companies/fWbKY87ZYwcTi4M3sTyDaN/Adidas-to-massproduce-3Dprinted-shoe-with-Silicon-Valley-s.html


Source: Livemint