satyamkapoor

I work at ValueFirst Digital Media Private Ltd. I am a Product Marketer in the Surbo Team. Surbo is Chatbot Generator Platform owned by Value First. ...

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I work at ValueFirst Digital Media Private Ltd. I am a Product Marketer in the Surbo Team. Surbo is Chatbot Generator Platform owned by Value First.

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A startup is brining AI technology to movies

By satyamkapoor |Email | Mar 30, 2018 | 10605 Views

There is a new technology being developed by companies like Arraiy which can automate the creation of digital effects for games, movies and television. Adobe is also working on this and this could potentially replace many of the experts who help build such digital effects.


Avalos, a Los-Angeles based filmmaker says that this is no joke and it can actually put people out of work. However he added that the artists are safe. This can help replace all the drudgery.


In the past three decades, computer generated imagery has completely transformed how movies and television shows get made. But adding digital effects is still a quite tedious and painstaking task. For every second of a movie time, hoards of designers can end up spending hours isolating objects and people in raw camera footage, then digitally building new images right from scratch and thereafter combining the two as seamlessly as possible.


Arraiy is trying to build systems that can handle at least a portion of this process. Arraiy is backed by more than $10 million in financing from SoftBank Ventures, Silicon Valley venture Lux Capital and others.


Thanks to the improvements that have taken place in the field of neural networks - these systems are capable of editing noise and mistakes out of images and also apply simple effects to create highly realistic images of say very fake people or for that matter graft one person's head onto the physical structure (body) of someone else.


Adobe, which is behind most of the software tools that are used by designers today, is also looking into machine learning that can help automate similar tasks.

Source: HOB