Rajendra

I write columns on news related to bots, specially in the categories of Artificial Intelligence, bot startup, bot funding.I am also interested in recent developments in the fields of data science, machine learning and natural language processing ...

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I write columns on news related to bots, specially in the categories of Artificial Intelligence, bot startup, bot funding.I am also interested in recent developments in the fields of data science, machine learning and natural language processing

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Oracle adds machine learning to cyber security defence

By Rajendra |Email | Oct 6, 2017 | 8757 Views

Oracle increasingly relies on machine learning for cybersecurity defence for its customers.On Sunday Oracle announced the launch of its new, highly autonomous database, but the vendor didn't leave it there. Two days on, during its massive OpenWorld conference in San Francisco, the company revealed the development of a supporting, highly-automated cyber defence service.

This service has been designed to work together with the autonomous Oracle 18c database to help mitigate costly cyber-attacks and data theft.
As described by Larry Ellison, Oracle's CTO, during a keynote presentation, it's "our people versus their computers".

Ellison spoke about the increasing rate of data that is stolen yearly from cyber-attacks, highlighting that as hackers get smarter, more automation is required to tackle the threats.

According to Ellison: "Automated security does a better job than manual security and costs less. More automation equals higher security, but you have to be willing to pay less."

Therefore, Oracle has been busy designing this highly automated defence system. "We need a cyber defence system that automatically detects vulnerabilities, fixes vulnerabilities before an attack and if there is an attack, detect it and shut it down," said Ellison.

Unlike the autonomous database, the cyber defence service is not fully autonomous just yet, but what Ellison did make clear during the keynote is that both services use machine learning to operate.

"Machine learning is the newest and most important technology to show up in a long time. The applications for machine learning are as important as anything that's happening in the world today," said Ellison.

The inclusion of machine learning enables the software to distinguish between normal behaviour from abnormal behaviour, and alert customers accordingly.

Cyber Security is more serious than we think
Ellison said that most line of business IT still don't take cybersecurity as seriously as they should, making it clear that businesses should consider restructuring their cyber defence strategies.

"The people who are focused on security take it very seriously. The people who have other jobs in the data centre are trying to get their jobs done," added Ellison.

This is where Oracle's management and security cloud system comes in. Oracle is looking to create what it calls "the industry's first cloud-native, intelligent security and management suite".

According to Oracle, this suite is expected to enable enterprises to reduce, detect and resolve cybersecurity threats, and with the integration of machine learning, businesses are able to tackle security breaches more quickly.

"It was built to run in the Oracle cloud and also manages all your Amazon assets and your on-premise systems," says Ellison.

Source: Computer World UK